Having fun isn’t hard when you have a library card

When I was a child, my favorite book was Chris van Allsburg’s The Polar Express. It was the book I used to figure out the ins and outs of the library business – I knew where it was supposed to be located on the shelf, and then I learned to look at the spine label … Continue reading Having fun isn’t hard when you have a library card

Truman vs. MacArthur

On June 25, 1950, the North Korean army streamed across the 38th parallel attacking the poorly equipped Republic of Korea (ROK) soldiers, driving them southward.  With the backing of the United Nations Security Council, President Harry S. Truman ordered General Douglas MacArthur to send  members of the 8th United States army, then on occupation duty … Continue reading Truman vs. MacArthur

Books for Boys

Somewhere between 7 and 9 years old, I became a Reader.  And by Reader I mean someone who loves to read.  I’d been “reading” (deciphering the alphabet to produce words whose meaning I understood) since I was about 3, and by first grade I was the best reader in my class (just a small elementary … Continue reading Books for Boys

This is not an eclipse post.

Last night I was sitting at home reading as the sun faded away, and the droning of crickets outside the house gradually drowned out the sound of the words on the page in front of me. This is the sound of a summer night – crickets raising heck outside, intermittent frog croaks from the pond, … Continue reading This is not an eclipse post.

Board Games — a great antidote to boredom!

August is National Anti-boredom Month. What better time to ponder the definitely un-boring world of board games, right? First of all, I have to confess, I am a board-gamer. An avid one. My husband and I have a collection of over 400 board games (more broadly referred to as tabletop games), ranging from 10 Days in … Continue reading Board Games — a great antidote to boredom!

YA Books Eclipsed by Bestsellers

Young Adult (YA) books have been in an incredible renaissance for the last few years, which only seems to be growing. Powerful topics like police brutality, Black Lives Matter, representation of disability, and more are now featured on the shelves, something that would have been a rare sight even 5-10 years ago. However, with so … Continue reading YA Books Eclipsed by Bestsellers

HST AND THE “POLICE ACTION” IN KOREA

On May 15, 2017, the Asheville Citizen-Times published an article about a Blue Ridge Honor Flight taking 90 veterans of World War II and the Korean War to Washington to see the memorials dedicated to those who had died in those wars.  The Korean War veterans were greeted at that memorial by members of the Republic … Continue reading HST AND THE “POLICE ACTION” IN KOREA

National Independent Retailer Month

by Eric Haggart Eric Haggart is our guest contributor to this Shelf Life in the Mountains. Eric writes for the Franklin Area Chamber of Commerce. The Chamber recently moved into a new location at 98 Hyatt Road, Franklin. The month of July is National Independent Retailer Month, and a majority of our member businesses are just that, … Continue reading National Independent Retailer Month

Audiobooks I Have Managed To Love

I have a difficult time listening to audiobooks. Usually when I’m driving I listen to music, and when I’m doddering about the house pretending to clean I listen to podcasts. For some reason, audiobooks fail to hold my attention long enough for me to finish them. However, since I do spend a lot of time … Continue reading Audiobooks I Have Managed To Love

Three childhood books that changed my life

I’ve always been a voracious reader (I started reading when I was 3), and what I read helped to shape my world. While I was in library school I took several courses dealing with children’s literature, and that spurred me to think about some of the books that most influenced me in my formative years. … Continue reading Three childhood books that changed my life