GALLIPOLI

This is a post I've done before, last year in fact.  But, this past Monday,April 25, was the 100 years anniversary since the Allies landed troops on the Gallipoli peninsula, primarily  the Anzacs, men from Australasia and New Zealand.   Memorial services were held this week those two countries, as well in London, where the Queen … Continue reading GALLIPOLI

CHURCHILL II, 1939-1965

When Winston Churchill became the First Lord of the Admiralty for the second time in 1939, he ended his decade exile from government.   Then Neville Chamberlain resigned as Prime Minister on May 10, 1940 and Winston Churchill assumed that office.   Soon afterwards he addressed the British people and later the House of Commons.  He … Continue reading CHURCHILL II, 1939-1965

Gallipoli Campaign

The Gallipoli campaign was a side bar in 1915, the second year of the First World War .  Gallipoli is a peninsula in northwest Turkey on the west side of a waterway leading from the Black Sea past Istanbul (it was called Constantinople in 1915) to the Adriatic Sea.   Because Russia was fighting on the side the … Continue reading Gallipoli Campaign

The End of Two Wars

One week from the publication date of this blog will be the one hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the Abraham Lincoln's assassination.  While Lincoln's funeral train was tracing in reverse Lincoln's trip from Illinois to Washington 1861, Jefferson Davis was hiding from federal troops trying to find him.   Eighty years later, in 1945, three days from the … Continue reading The End of Two Wars

D-Day, Part 2

By Stephen My last blog ended at H-Hour off the Normandy beaches, with Allied forces getting ready to land at 6:30 AM (British double summer time), June 6, 1944.   While the landing craft were heading to the shore, a naval barrage was sending shells toward the German defenses and bombers were unloading their bombs, trying … Continue reading D-Day, Part 2

D-Day, Part One

By Stephen Early in June 1944, seventy years ago, Southern England saw thousands of Allied troops gathering in preparation for the invasion of Europe.  Over 400 miles to the north I was a Scottish schoolboy approaching my sixth birthday in Aberdeen.  I don't remember, but I am sure I heard reports  on the progress of the war from … Continue reading D-Day, Part One

World War I, Part 1

By Stephen At the end of June 1914, few Americans paid attention to a story in newspapers about the assassination of the heir to the Austrian-Hungary throne in the Serbian capital of Sarajevo.  The Austrians demanded satisfaction from the Serbians with an ultimatum.  Germany backed Austria, Russia supported  their fellow Slavs in Serbia, and France … Continue reading World War I, Part 1