Earth Day

Warm sunshine.  Rainy days.  Blooming plants.  The Earth is alive in this wonderful Spring season!  This is the perfect time to have Earth Day.  I guess that is why in 1970, 47 years ago, the first Earth Day was observed.  Earth Day is held to  “demonstrate support for environmental protection”.  Topics can include environmental clean up and awareness to endangered/extinct animals.  What Earth Day looks like is unique to each community.

Some community groups come together to do clean ups and activities to promote taking care of our precious planet Earth like clean ups of local parks and waterways to keep the environment in good shape for wildlife.

In Swain County, the NC Cooperative Extension is offering a free Norway Spruce Seedling to the public on April 29th from from 9 to 12.  While this is not exactly on Earth Day, it is close to the actual day and Arbor Day, which is April 28, so it makes sense that they would do something on this particular date.

In Jackson County they are having the annual Greening Up the Mountains Festival.  It will be their 20th year of doing this and according to their website it is, “Strengthened by its early roots as an Earth Day celebration, the festival includes a focus on environmental protection, sustainability, and promotion of local businesses and civic groups.”

Fontana Regional Library has materials available to help you and your family learn about Earth Day including ideas of how to get you involved in keeping our Earth clean and healthy for years to come.

The Earth and I by Frank Asch

The Curious Garden by Peter Brown

Compost Stew by Mary McKenna Siddals

The Earth Book by Todd Parr

Earth Day by Julie Murray

Every Day is Earth Day by Jane O’Connor

Every Day is Earth Day:  A Craft Book by Kathy Ross

Celebrating Earth Day:  A Sourcebook of Activities and Experiments by Robert Gardner

Earth Day:  Keeping Our Planet Green by Elaine Landau

It’s Earth Day! by Mercer Mayer

Earth Day Birthday by Pattie Schnetzler

Biscuit’s Earth Day Celebration by Alyssa Satin Capucilli

Engineering an Awesome Recycling Center with Max Axiom, Super Scientist by Nikole Brooks Bethea

The Smash! Smash! Truck by Professor Potts

Don’t Throw That Away!  A Lift the Flap Book About Recycling and Reusing by Lara Bergen

Recycling is Fun by Charles Ghigna

Recycling by Rebecca Pettiford

What Milly Did:  The Remarkable Pioneer of Plastics Recycling by Elise Moser

The Adventures of a Plastic Bottle:  A Story About Recycling by Alison Inches

We Are Extremely Very Good Recyclers by Lauren Child

Plastic Free:  How I kicked the Plastic Habit and How You Can Too by Beth Terry

Waste and Recycling by Sally Morgan

One Plastic Bag by Miranda Paul

Remake It!:  More than 100 Recycling Projects for the Stuff You Usually Scrap by Tiffany Threadgould

Eco Books:  Inventive Projects from the Recycling Bin by Terry Taylor

Why Should I Recycle Garbage? by MJ Knight

Recycle EveryDay by Tammy Gagne

The Great Trash Bash by Loreen Leedy

Early Childhood Activities for a Greener Earth by Patty Born Selly

Planet Earth:  25 Environmental Projects You Can Build Yourself by Kathleen M. Reilly

Taking care of our Earth is key to its survival.  Take a moment and think about how you can make an impact whether you decide to start recycling regularly, plant something, or just take the initiative to clean up trash in your neighborhood.  It all matters and your efforts do make a difference!  Happy Earth Day!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earth Friendly

By Faye

Do you like handmade crafts? Even though you know they are worth every cent of the price tag is it still more than you want to pay? Why not try your hand at creating beautiful crafts from recyclables.

Instead of taking cans, bottles, paper and even clothing to the landfill create artwork!

The Big Green Book of Recycled Crafts has over 100 earth friendly projects for you. For tips about earth friendly stitching check out the book by Betz White, Sewing Green or Resew : turn thrift-store finds into fabulous designs by Jenny Wilding Cardon.

I received an email that I would like to share. I remember so many of these and I guess that’s why it is a delight to read. I have tried to find the origin of it but cannot. The author is unknown.

  Subject: The green thing – and oh so true!

In the queue at the shop, the cashier told the older woman that she
should bring her own bags because plastic bags weren’t good for the
environment.

The woman apologized to him and explained, “We didn’t have the green
thing back in my day.”

The cashier responded, “That’s our problem today. The former generation
did not care enough to save our environment!”

He was right, that generation didn’t have the green thing in its day.

Back then, they returned their milk bottles, lemonade bottles and beer
bottles to the shop. The shop sent them back to the plant to be washed
and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and
over. So they really were recycled. But they didn’t have the green
thing back in that customer’s day.

In her day, they walked up stairs, because they didn’t have an escalator
in every shop and office building. They walked to the grocery shop and
didn’t climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time they had to go two
miles.

But she was right. They didn’t have the green thing in her day.

Back then, they washed the baby’s nappies because they didn’t have the
throw-away kind. They dried clothes on a line, not in an energy gobbling
machine burning up 220 volts – wind and solar power really did dry the
clothes. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters,
not always brand-new clothing.

But that old lady is right; they didn’t have the green thing back in her
day.

Back then, they had one TV, or radio, in the house – not a TV in every
room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief, not a
screen the size of Wales . In the kitchen, they blended and stirred by
hand because they didn’t have electric machines to do everything for
them.

When they packaged a fragile item to send in by post, they used a
screwed up old newspaper to cushion it, not polystyrene or plastic
bubble wrap.

Back then, they didn’t fire up an engine and burn petrol just to cut the
lawn. They used a push mower that ran on human power. They exercised by
working so they didn’t need to go to a health club to run on treadmills
that operate on electricity.

But she’s right; they didn’t have the green thing back then.

They drank from a fountain when they were thirsty instead of using a cup
or a plastic bottle every time they had a drink of water. They refilled
their writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and they
replaced the razor blades in a razor instead of throwing away the whole
razor just because the blade got dull.

But they didn’t have the green thing back then.

Back then, people took the tram or a bus and kids rode their bikes to
school or rode in the school bus instead of turning their mums into a
24-hour taxi service. They had one electrical socket in a room, not an
entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances.

And they didn’t need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed
from satellites 2,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest
Pizza Hut.

But isn’t it sad the current generation laments how wasteful the old
folks were just because they didn’t have the green thing back then?