“Bad Moon Rising,” Vietnam, Pt. 2

After the French left a divided Vietnam in 1955, the United States government agreed to take over the training of South Vietnam's troops.  The first military advisers found an ill equipped,  poorly trained army with an officer corps that was generally inept.  Advisers were embedded at every level of the ARVN and officers were sent to … Continue reading “Bad Moon Rising,” Vietnam, Pt. 2

Katrina, Ike, Harvey, Irma, Maria, Etc.

  Note:  In addition to books available in the collections of Fontana Regional Library and the NC Cardinal consortium I used articles from databases in NC Live. In recent weeks three category four or five hurricanes devastated multiple Caribbean islands, Puerto Rico,  the Gulf coast of Texas  and the whole state of Florida.  Remnants of … Continue reading Katrina, Ike, Harvey, Irma, Maria, Etc.

HST AND THE “POLICE ACTION” IN KOREA

On May 15, 2017, the Asheville Citizen-Times published an article about a Blue Ridge Honor Flight taking 90 veterans of World War II and the Korean War to Washington to see the memorials dedicated to those who had died in those wars.  The Korean War veterans were greeted at that memorial by members of the Republic … Continue reading HST AND THE “POLICE ACTION” IN KOREA

Summer Music Memories

If you have ever been a listener to popular music, you’ve probably had the experience of “summer” music – when a song or an album becomes identified with the summer season. It might be even be a particular summer – the summer just after high school graduation, or the summer you got your first full-time … Continue reading Summer Music Memories

Barbara Tuchman

Recently, when I was reorganizing my personal library, I noticed I had a number of books by the American writer Barbara  Wertheim Tuchman, including one I used in my last blog, The Zimmerman Telegram. Her topics ranged time wise and  geographically  from  ancient history  to the twentieth century and from the Far East to the Americas.  Like … Continue reading Barbara Tuchman

The Lusitania: United States One Step Closer to War

April is the 100th anniversary of the United States declaring war on Germany and its allies the Great Powers.   The Wilson administration's decision to go to war was not taken lightly or in haste. In fact, it was almost two years after the sinking of the Lusitania that  The president  appeared before a joint session of … Continue reading The Lusitania: United States One Step Closer to War

Churchill’s “The World Crisis”

As we get closer to November 11, Veteran's Day in the United States and Remembrance Day in the UK, we need to remember those have sacrificed their lives so we can live in freedom.  One hundred years ago the Great War was being fought in Europe and the Middle East.  As I do every year … Continue reading Churchill’s “The World Crisis”

Why Read Moby Dick?

I don't recall if I ever attempted to read Moby Dick in the past.  I have faint memories of seeing Gregory Peck on the movie screen as the one legged Captain Ahab driven to madness in his striving to get revenge from the great white whale.  At that time, over sixty years ago, we had Classic … Continue reading Why Read Moby Dick?

Letters from (and to) the Front, Part I

Recently I was prowling the book donations at the thrift store where I volunteer  and I came across a copy of  War Letters:  Extraordinary Correspondence from American Wars, edited by Andrew Carroll.  The Legacy Project, which is the source from which these letters came, was founded in 1998 as a gathering place for veterans and their … Continue reading Letters from (and to) the Front, Part I

Samuel Eliot Morison

I believe it was when I was in Junior High that friend of our family gave me a copy of Samuel Eliot Morison's book Admiral of the Ocean Sea:  a Life of  Christopher Columbus.   That was my introduction to the writings of Dr. Morison, who, unbeknownst to me when I was a teenage boy, was … Continue reading Samuel Eliot Morison