Voting In America, The Past

November 6th, better known as Midterm Election Day 2018, is right around the corner. I would like to take a moment to look at where we, as a nation, have come from in regards to voting rights, so that we can look at our own voting behavior today. Who gets to vote, and why? Elections … Continue reading Voting In America, The Past

FRL – looking back, looking forward

As I get ready to retire next month, I find myself looking back at nearly 25 years of working for the Fontana Regional Library System.  There have been a lot of changes.  Walking into the Macon County Public Library on Wayah Street, for my first day on the job, the first thing I found myself … Continue reading FRL – looking back, looking forward

D&D at your local library

Hi everyone! Julia from Jackson County Public Library here with my first blog for Shelf Life of the Mountains. For this first post I had originally thought to write about ghost writing, comparing and contrasting it to best selling writers that use co-authors, such as James Patterson.  I quickly realized that the content was well… … Continue reading D&D at your local library

Hike with Pride this month!

June is LGBTQIA+ Pride Month as well as Great Outdoors Month and so this blog will be about both! LGBTQIA+ is an acronym that stands for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual and the plus is for gender fluid people - people whose gender identity changes over time or per situation. Queer is a … Continue reading Hike with Pride this month!

The Rise of the Verse Novel: Celebrating National Poetry Month

I loved poetry as a child. I read a lot of it, memorized some favorite poems, and tried to write my own (very badly, I must say). As I grew up, I wandered away from poetry for the most part, with a few notable exceptions -- John Donne and W. B. Yeats in particular. In … Continue reading The Rise of the Verse Novel: Celebrating National Poetry Month

Women’s Rights: from A Vindication of the Women’s Rights, to the Women’s March and #metoo Movement

"The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any state on account of sex. “Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.”   19th Amendment to the Constitution, passed on May 21st, 1919 and ratified on August 18th, 1920. … Continue reading Women’s Rights: from A Vindication of the Women’s Rights, to the Women’s March and #metoo Movement

In Praise of eBooks

One of the things about doing a bit of a retrospective of where you’ve been in the last year is that you occasionally realize things that sort of slid by you when you were actually experiencing them. While compiling my list of top 10 recommendations of books I read in 2016 , I did a count … Continue reading In Praise of eBooks

Rollicking Reads from 2016

It is the time of year for retrospectives.  And rather than recap celebrity deaths (Prince, Bowie, Mariah Carey’s career), I thought I’d pick a handful of materials I’ve checked out from the library that gave me hours of enjoyment this past year of 2016. They were not all published in 2016, but 2016 was the … Continue reading Rollicking Reads from 2016

Reading Series – a professional’s guide

Probably the first series I ever encountered was one my three older sisters had “bequeathed” to the family collection – it was the Trixie Belden mystery series. As I read the single book in the series that we had on our bookshelves, I quickly became aware of (and somewhat annoyed at) the fact that the … Continue reading Reading Series – a professional’s guide

On Janisse Ray, Environment, and History’s Knack for Repeating Itself

I have recently revisited Georgia-born author Janisse Ray's work of nonfiction titled Ecology of a Cracker Childhood. The book's innards are in the title as Ray alternates chapters where she recounts her  childhood memories with contrasting subject matter of the unique ecology of southern Georgia's coastal plain otherwise known as the longleaf pine wiregrass ecosystem. Janisse Ray … Continue reading On Janisse Ray, Environment, and History’s Knack for Repeating Itself